Cock-a-doodle-doo! Barnyard Hullabaloo Author: Giles Andreae Illustrator: David Wojtowycz
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Format: Picture Books, Paperbacks

Age Range: 3-7 years

Publication Date: March 2002

BISAC: JUV002090, JUV057000

Pages: 32

Book Format Detail: Hardcover

Retail Price: $16.95

ISBN-13: 978-1-58925-020-8

ISBN-10: 1-58925-020-6

Dimensions: 9-3/4" x 12-1/4"

Publication Date: September 2004

BISAC: JUV002090, JUV057000

Pages: 32

Book Format Detail: Paperback

Retail Price: $7.95

ISBN-13: 978-1-58925-387-2

ISBN-10: 1-58925-387-6

Dimensions: 9-1/2" x 12"

"This bright, inviting book introduces a farm’s inhabitants. The first spread shows the barnyard from outside the fence, with all the animals that live inside. Then, the pigs, donkey, ducks, and geese and others all introduce themselves through a lively, rhyming, first-person verse and an illustration full of movement and color. The visit ends as night falls, but not before readers meet the nighttime animals. A final two-page spread takes children back outside the fence as the rural denizens go to sleep and the fox sneaks off to hunt prey.... It has a lively read-aloud text and the clearly drawn, easily identified animals are filled with personality." -School Library Journal

Accelerated Reader: 56863

“The rooster wakes the farm up / With a cock-a –doodle-do! / The sheepdog won’t stop barking, / And the cows begin to moo.” This book about farm life features a singsong rhyme and a bright, full-paged picture of each of the resident animals. Among them: a flower-sniffing donkey and a sheep who pretends she is a cloud. Your child will enjoy pointing at the animals, chanting the words, and supplying the squawks, moos, and clippety-clops. (Ages 1-5)

 

June 2000, Sesame Street Parents

PreS-K – This bright, inviting book introduces a farm’s in habitants. The first spread shows the barnyard from outside the fence, with all the animals that live inside. Then, the pigs, donkey, ducks, and geese and others all introduce themselves through a lively, rhyming, first person verse and an illustration full of movement and color. The visit ends as night falls, but not before readers meet the nighttime animals. A final two-page spread takes children back outside the fence as the rural denizens go to sleep and the fox sneaks off to hunt prey. Sound words are scattered on some of the pages, a device that might prove somewhat confusing to very young listeners. “Wag! Wag!” appears nest to the dog’s tail, rather than the sound the animal makes. “Wriggle” and “snuffle” appear for the pigs even though every three-year-old knows a pig says, “oink.” And geese are supposed to “honk,” not “cackle” or “squawk.” Still, these are minor flaws that do not overwhelm the book’s many virtues. It has a lively read-aloud text and the clearly drawn, easily identified animals are filled with personality. —Jane Marino, Scarsdale Public Library, NY

 

April 2000, School Library Journal

Ages 2-4. The simple, sing-song verse is about farmyard animals from dawn to night, but preschoolers will enjoy the physicalness of the words (“we babble and cackle and squawk”) and the nonsense (”mooing and chewing / Are what I like doing. / Do you moo when you chew your food?”). The big, simple cutout shapes look like flannel-board art, just right for sharing with the lapsit crowd, one on one or in a group. – Hazel R

 

March 15, 2000, Booklist